Nature at the seams: A Bristol photo essay

In this photo essay Aggie shows us her perspective on nature within the city of Bristol

Bristol is a city held together by nature; it’s intertwined within the cracks, pavements, and falling across our doors. 

For a long time the nature in this city has made the city feel safer than most. Having a bad day? The surrounding hills, meadows and trees will catch you when you fall. Feeling stressed out? Take a walk, look out over the hills, and remember that the freedom of the countryside is just a short bike ride away. 

I have created a photo essay to celebrate how the city allows its wild roots and leaves to dance around our city, reminding us that no matter how much technological or industrial development takes place, nature is here to stay.

A post box near Leigh Woods, submerged in leaves from the surrounding trees.

Reflection in Geraniums. Taken from my front yard. Capturing my reflection in the window as I photograph the geraniums growing on my window sill. In the background you can see the vines creeping down the wall behind me.

If you take a walk through Clifton you may come across this ‘Secret Garden’. It’s a fun place to get lost in, and has a hint of nostalgia if you have read the novel or watched the 1993 film adaptation.

With views overlooking the city, this photo reminds us that the city feel in Bristol is interwoven with nature around it. Beyond the gate you can see city tower blocks, with rolling hills behind them.

Doors which thought they were forgotten, overtaken by the ivy.

A familiar street in Kingsdown. A beautiful view out over the city on this summer’s day. This street is filled with plants bursting through walls and fences.

Shrubs overhanging pathways on Stokes Croft, as the bustling street goes about its day.

Bristol Harbourside. This beautiful area in Bristol is a whole side of nature on its own, but if you take a long walk around the docks you will be able to see plants shaping the water. They creep up through the pavement or are neatly potted on the canals, sitting on the water.

And lastly, the pink and white dasies wildly growing en-masse in my back garden.

Do you feel closer to the nature in the city? Let us know in the comments.

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