Meet The Dogs Of Bristol

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Molly went out into Bristol to capture its dogs (on film), find out what they get up to and what they think of their owners.

If you have a dog you’ll know how much of your life, your bed, your time, your affection they take up. You probably can’t take them to work or school but if you could you would. Imagine, your dog lying at your feet while you typed out all those angry emails.

Big or small, vicious or cute, either way, you love them or hate them, which means they have enough personality to leave a judgement. So I went out into Bristol to capture its dogs, find out what they get up to and what they think of their owners.

 Molly, Vassals park, saturday afternoon 

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Molly is a labrador who loves being taking taken for walks and her owner doesn’t mind if she runs into big muddy puddles. Her owner, Deb, says Molly knows when you’re in a sad mood or not well as she comes and rests her head on your knee. ‘Molly is great company’

Lucy, brandon hill, wednesday afternoon

Lucy 1200x900

Lucy is a Jack Russell cross rescue dog that loves to play with a ball. If Lucy could speak she’d say ‘where’s the ball’ owner Charles says.

 Maddy, vassals park, saturday afternoon

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Ghost Poodle Maddy was a very quiet dog, but confident as she approached gracefully to greet me.  If Maddy could talk, she’s say ‘I think my mummy spoils me rotten. She gives me everything I want as she knows I’m the boss. She takes me to the park even when she doesn’t feel too well and she always puts me first.’

Roxi, st george, friday afternoon

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Roxi can’t wait to go on holiday for lovely walks on the beach and fun in the sea. Owner Jo says ‘Roxi is very loyal, quick on her paws and likes to eat anything she can find.’ A question Roxi would ask is ‘When will my tea be ready?’ as she’s always hungry.

Max, vassals park, saturday afternoon

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Max, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, was either chasing his tail or jumping up onto his owners lap when I met him. This very energetic dog is much loved by owner Barbara who says ‘Max is very loving but at nearly seven years old, he still behaves like a naughty two-year-old’.

Lily, st george, friday morning

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Lily is a Bichon Frise that loves getting treats and ruling owner Jean’s life. Although, the one eyed fluff ball is quite dominant character, Jean says that ‘Lily is a great companion who is full of tricks. She also takes up all of the bed’.

Monty, speedwell, sunday morning

Credit: Molly Perryman

Credit: Molly Perryman

Cocker Spaniel Monty loves hugs and cuddles and is always pleased to see owner Courtney. ‘Monty howls in the morning until I wake up to see him’. Monty was quite yappy until being mesmerised by a treat when taking this photo.

So there you go, a little flavour of what kind of dogs live in Bristol and what they think of their owners.

As you can see, most dogs love sleeping in luxury in their owners beds and adore lots of love and treats as well as being the boss of the household. Most owners expressed how much time and investment goes into keeping a happy dog and how worthwhile it is so if you are begging your parents for a puppy and they say ‘no’ then maybe it’s not the right time to have a furry pet. Instead you can volunteer in a pets home or even apply for dog walking jobs or just take a stroll in the park to see what cuties are out there until you can afford the investment.

Have a dog? Want to say a bit about them? Send us a pic and info @rifemag

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