The St. Pauls Selfie Challenge – the results!

 

Credit: Jon Aitken

Credit: Jon Aitken

Remember those challenges we set Jon, the boy who’d never been to St. Pauls Carnival before? Let’s examine the humiliation below.

To recap – the challenges were as follows:

  • Find a vegetarian dish (good luck with that one)
  • Show us your best dance moves in the parade
  • Use the toilet in someone’s house
  • Stand as close as you can to a bass bin without popping your eardrums
  • Buy a string vest and wear it
  • Take a selfie with a Rasta

The first #SPselfies came a couple of days before the carnival with Mistri from Ujima Radio, after an amazing show in which he pitched his own idea for Rife Magazine (a visual piece about the state of the portaloos at the carnival.)

After a good night’s sleep I was more than ready.

And so the parade began!

Immediate selfies with the Youth Providers early on:

FIRST CHALLENGE COMPLETED WITH EASE (thanks for the help, Urban Fit ladies):

I even managed to make some new friends along the way!

It was lunchtime and I could feel the next challenge coming on:

EASY. Nowhere near as hard as you jerk-chicken lovers were making it out to be. Cheers Agnes.

AND ANOTHER ONE!

But seriously:

But being fed and watered meant only one thing: time to find a toilet.

// CHALLENGE COMPLETE! 50p later... #SPselfies #stpaulscarnival https://t.co/Bp3ttKJRaN — Rife magazine (@rifemag) July 5, 2014 And - annoyingly - about another half hour after THAT:

Throughout the carnival people were using #SPselfie to send in their own moments: // ]]>

BOOM. He looked so sedate until I whipped the camera out:

// This little guy's dad was more than happy for him to be on Rife #proud #SPselfies #stpaulscarnival pic.twitter.com/GurzZdfgih — Rife magazine (@rifemag) July 5, 2014 So..

CHALLENGE. SMASHED. // ]]>

My name is Jon and I am no longer a St. Pauls Carnival virgin. Did you go carnival? Let us know on twitter and go and have a look at all the extra tweets that we couldn't fit here.

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