Five Completely Flawless Steps to Going Viral (Work)

Jon Aitken goes viral. This is how you dooooo it…

So you’ve got an idea and you want it to go viral? Well tough, because nobody’s cracked that one yet – sorry. Even kittens don’t cut it anymore.  However, there are some steps to ensure you’re making something worthy of hitting the big time, and we learnt from the best (aka Matt Golding from Rubber Republic – they’ve made some videos for Bodyform and Fiat, you’ve probably seen them):

1. Know who you’re talking to.

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via reddit.com

Follow them – even if you have to go into the depths of the Internet – and see what they’re already liking and sharing (just don’t do any thing restraining order-y.)

2. Do your research.

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via reddit.com

This fabulous idea you’re so enthusiastic about – it’s been done before. But don’t even think about crying in the corner, you need to move on and work out how to make your version 10x better.

3. Trust your instincts.

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via reddit.com

Does it feel right? Do it. However:

4. Be nice.

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Don’t be offensive. Remember that when you upload something to the internet the whole world can see it, not just your target audience. That’s a lot of very angry people. Perhaps it’s you who should be considering the merits of restraining orders now…

5. Go out there and do it.

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via tumblr.com

Stop procrastinating by looking at lists of motivational gifs like these and just go and make whatever it is you’re planning before somebody else does (and then bask in the glory of your success.)

Points have been taken from a masterclass led by Matt Golding on 8/4/14 for those involved in the Bristol Talent Lab, in conjunction with Watershed.

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